Writing – Photos – Travel – Crafts


Local celebrity Benji Galloway.

It has finally started snowing again in the Northwest so you may not have to resort to breaking out your skateboard, but if you actually enjoy skateboarding, you may just want to. Portland’s first indoor concrete skatepark, Commonwealth Skateboarding, opened it’s doors for business on February 26th.

As a snowboarder (read: mediocre skateboarder) the park is non threatening with only a few sections topping the 3 foot mark. In addition to the main bowl, there is a mini ramp and a street area with bank, box and flat bar. However, the actual skating at the grand opening celebration was not for the casual enthusiast, with some of Portland’s best skateboarders dodging and weaving to get a taste at the brand new park.

The park was the brainchild of, and also serves as the office for legendary shred journalist Jennifer Sherowski. Jen and her man candy Lance Normine, along with the park building skills of Billy Coulon, and hours of slave labor from various friends, birthed the park over the past month and a half. It is half concrete paradise, half gallery/office, and conveniently located on SE 20th and Hawthorne, which if you’re not familiar with Portland is, as they say, “close in.”


Some people enjoying photography and good ol’ conversation.

Commonwealth is now open seven days a week to the general public, with some special sessions designated on various nights. If you enjoy rolling on concrete, you will likely enjoy this park, so get down there and check it out.

http://www.commonwealthskateboarding.com/


Slave Labor Appreciation Day

At this point we’ve seen enough boards, boots, bindings, outerwear and accessories that it feels like it’s already 2012. The boards have things like ollie bars, scoop bases and kick jammers (we made those last two up). Outerwear is more more tech (or in some cases less tech) and will hopefully keep you warm and dry on hill. You can get a goggle to match absolutely any outfit, and a helmet too. Bindings are more adjustable than ever, and boots are the lightest they’ve ever been. And collaborations are still hot. But what did we really learn at SIA? We learned what will sell this year. See the above pie chart for the highly scientific break down.

Now check the gallery for photos of new gear from Bern, Banshee Bungee, Holden, Salomon, K2, L1, Nike Snowboarding, Nitro, Ride, Rome and Technine.

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Unlike miniramps at skate tradeshows, it’s easy to drop in on the session at the Salomon booth. All the snowboarders are busy taking photos with their phones.

Day two of SIA 2011 happened and it was a lot like day one. New products, familiar faces, etc, but there were a few key differences:

-All hangovers were provided by the Burton stripper party. We’d post lots of awesome pictures but they don’t let you take pictures at strip clubs, duh.
-There was a Videograss teaser premiere at Salomon.
-Terry Kidwell was there.

Connor from MNMNT totally met Terry Kidwell. We didn’t but we took a picture of him once, so pretend we did.

That about sums it up. Two more days to go, and we’ve still got booths to check out, elbows to rub. If you’re not here, you’re probably thinking, man, I would love to go to SIA, quit bitching. But if you are here, you understand and I’d like to provide a few pointers for surviving the next two days of the show.

- Your lips are probably chapped. Ski accessory companies love to give out free chapstick. Head over into the annals of the convention center and pick yours up.
- You know how your back and neck are killing you? It’s because you’re standing all day, but also because of your badge that is quickly filling with business cards and weighing you down. Even though the old ladies at the door insist you MUST have it around your neck, wearing it as a dangler from your belt loop will make all the difference.
-Start asking different questions. At this point, every one has explained their season is going great, they’re really having fun riding, and the show is going really well 150-plus times. Get a little more creative. For example, ask if they’ve boned any hot Denver sluts yet.
-Trade show security is really cracking down on beer and booths serving beer illegally. You can avoid getting anyone in trouble by finding one of the few booths who paid $800 for an official keg and getting a beer there. Then save your cup and use it for all beers after that. If you’re drinking from the official ski-brand sponsored cup, no one can say anything!
-Remember, at least you’re not at the X Games.

The future is now at Academy. Seriously, the boards are from 2012!

No but seriously, we checked out a bunch more products you can start getting excited to buy. Here are lots of pictures of the stuff we checked out today. If you are not into product shots however, we recommend you read about Shaun White’s new costume.

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It seems like every clown has a clothing company now. Any why not? This is America, where rumor is, you can do anything you want. All it takes is some ingenuity, a little bit of cash and a ton of hard work, and there you have it, your own clothing brand. At least, that’s the dream. Most people though, never get beyond the idea part, and having an actual operating business isn’t as common as you’d think. The following five brands come from across the country (and even one in the middle) and all have their own unique style. The one thing they all have in common: the are all owned and operated by real people who really love snowboarding.

Common Apparel

Established: September 2010
Location: Duluth, Minnesota

common-apparel.com

Yobeat: Why would you start a snowboard company in this economy?

Nate Blomquist: I started off small and just used my own money I had from working. I am pretty young for a business owner which means I have few bills to pay so the risk wasn’t too high to start up this business. I just feel snowboarding is going to get bigger and it seems like a good idea to get in to this market.

What’s different about your brand?

It would definitely have to be the exclusiveness. I don’t print too many of the same designs and I have more color choices. I make sure that my clothing is high in comfort and quality. My brand is based around a taller fit because it should just be the common fit anyways.

No really, why should people support you and not some other independent brand?

I think people should support Common Apparel because its uncommon but common at the same time to wear our products. As a rider operated company we notice the change in style in snowboarding and Common Apparel adapts to the changes. Everything made by our company is made by riders.

Who are you and why do you think you’re qualified to run a business?

Well I am Nate Blomquist and I am 18 years old. I am from Plymouth, Minnesota but am currently living up in Duluth. I have been selling stuff on the internet for years now such as broken technology I get from people I know and other items. My main business was when Nike SB Dunks were hot and were limited. So I would just buy a few pairs of each shoe that came out and sold them for more on eBay. The way I think is usually business related. I just thought, why not combine what I love to do and a career choice of business. All I do everyday is skateboard or snowboard. I just thought it would be cool to start a business in the market I fit in to. I think I am qualified to run a business because I keep track of all my records and I manage money well. I notice what sells and what doesn’t at the same time figuring out what people want. I take suggestions from people which is cool because big companies don’t get the little talk of what the riders want. I like being able to make what I want and pick the designs.

Rumor is snowboarding is shrinking and skiing is the next big thing. Do you plan on sponsoring skiers to make more money?

I don’t think I would really because money isn’t everything. Skiing has its whole different style and that would be difficult to keep up on all the trends of skiing while focusing on what snowboarders want. Common Apparel is targeted for snowboarders and skateboarders.

What will you do after you get rich off snowboarding?

If Common Apparel does get big that means I would get to ride a lot more and that is what I want. If business does increase I will just keep making the quality better and better. That would be my dream to make it big in snowboarding because I could pay my school off and not be in debt for years to come.

Epoch Apparel

Established: October 2007
Location: Tacoma and Bellingham, Washington

epochapparel.com

Yobeat: Why would you start a snowboard company in this economy?

Kyle Macdonald: Really, we didn’t start it in this economy. Truth is we’ve been a “start-up” for going on 4 years, but four years ago we didn’t know that we’d love sewing and hooking people up so much, so we keep doing it, regardless of what some big Wall Street stuffed shirts tell us about our money.

What’s different about your brand?

We make clothes that are fun to make and fun to wear, and we make them. Everything we make or ever have made was made by one of 4 people in a basement or a barn, by hand.  Because its all made by hand by one of us, we try to keep everything original and different, so no two people ever look the same.

No really, why should people support you and not some other independent brand?

We don’t want people to just support us. I think that in “this economy,” passion and creativity is all we got, and independent brands are putting their hearts into what they love, so I say, support ‘em all! Don’t forget about us, though.

Who are you and why do you think you’re qualified to run a business?

We are John Goetz and Kyle MacDonald, and one day, we decided to learn to sew. We love sewing, so you can count on being your hoodies second lover, because we probably loved ‘er for 3 hours before you even set your eyes on it. If it fits a little weird or smells like us when you get it, it’s because we wore it already, because we love it. Is that enough? And John is a business major in college, for what it’s worth.

Rumor is snowboarding is shrinking and skiing is the next big thing. Do you plan on sponsoring skiers to make more money?

We would love to be able to live off of what we do, but it’s not about the money for us. We have been supporting people of all kinds for a long time, because we don’t want to just recognize people killing it in the snowboarding industry, but we want to show our appreciation for anyone who is making it happen for anyone or doing anything rad.

What will you do after you get rich off snowboarding?

Keep sewing.

Gnarly Clothing

Established: November 2009
Location: Laguna Beach, Ca

gnarlyclothes.com

YoBeat: Why would you start a snowboard company in this economy?

Jon Francis: TO BE CLEAR WE ARE ONLY MAKING CLOTHES, NO SNOWBOARDS.   BUT IT DIDN’T NECESSARILY  MATTER TO US WHAT WAS GOING ON WITH THE ECONOMY OR SNOWBOARD INDUSTRY AT THE TIME.  BOTH THE ECONOMY AND SNOWBOARDING WILL ALWAYS BE CHANGING.  THE BIGGEST THING WAS THAT WE WEREN’T REALLY BACKING THE DIRECTION OF A LOT OF THE OTHER CLOTHING COMPANIES OUT THERE AND WANTED TO SHOW THE WAY WE SEE SNOWBOARDING, AT THE SAME TIME MAKING CLOTHES THAT WE ALL WANT TO WEAR.   SO A LITTLE OVER A YEAR AGO, KEEGAN, DYLAN, AND I GOT TOGETHER, PUT OUR FRIENDS ON THE TEAM,  AND STARTED ‘GNARLY’

What’s different about your brand?

WE ARE SNOWBOARDERS AND SKATEBOARDERS MAKING CLOTHING FOR SNOWBOARDERS AND SKATEBOARDERS.  NO CORPORATE BOSSES TRYING TO TELL US WHAT IS COOL OR HOW WE SHOULD MARKET OUR COMPANY.
WE GET TO PUT OUR FRIENDS ON OUR TEAM REGARDLESS OF THEIR STATUS ON THE TW EXPOSURE METER, AND FOCUS ON SUPPORTING THESE KIDS THAT WE BELIEVE IN.  THERE ARE A LOT OF UNIQUE INDIVIDUALS INVOLVED WITH ‘GNARLY’ AND WE GET TO TAKE EVERYONE’S IDEAS AND IMPLEMENT THEM INTO EVERYTHING WE DO AS A COMPANY.

No really, why should people support you and not some other independent brand?

I DON’T EXPECT EVERYONE TO SUPPORT US.  THERE ARE LOTS OF HATERS, COOL CLIQUES, AND IN AND OUT TRENDS IN SNOWBOARDING.  WE ARE JUST GOING TO STICK WITH WHAT WE LIKE, AND THE KIDS WHO SUPPORT US CAN COME ALONG WITH, THE REST CAN DO THEIR OWN THING AND THAT DOESN’T BOTHER US EITHER.

Who are you and why do you think you’re qualified to run a business?

MY NAME IS JON FRANCIS.  I WAS THE MARKETING DIRECTOR AND TEAM MANAGER FOR A CLOTHING COMPANY CALLED AMBIGUOUS FOR THE BETTER PART OF 7 YEARS. I WAS A NATIONAL SALES MANAGER FOR ONE OF THE LARGER CORPORATE COMPANIES IN THIS INDUSTRY (WHICH WAS A JOKE), I’M THE SNOW EDITOR FOR BL!SSS MAGAZINE, I’VE BEEN SNOWBOARDING SINCE  THE YEAR KEEGAN WAS BORN, AND I HAVE THE SUPPORT AND HELP FROM MY PARTNERS KEEGAN VALAIKA AND DYLAN FAIT.

Rumor is snowboarding is shrinking and skiing is the next big thing. Do you plan on sponsoring skiers to make more money?

NOT SURE IF THAT IS TRUE OR NOT, BUT I DO KNOW SOME KIDS WHO RIP ON SKIS AND I COMPLETELY BACK IT.  FOR US, WE WILL NOT BE MARKETING TOWARDS SKIING THOUGH, MONEY OR NOT.

What will you do after you get rich off snowboarding?

I WILL STILL BE SNOWBOARDING.  TRAVELING AROUND THIS AMAZING WORLD!!!

Owner Operator

Established: 2007-2011
Location: Providence, RI and New York, NY.

www.operatorusa.com

Yobeat: Why would you start a snowboard company in this economy?

Steven Kimura: We didn’t start Owner Operator in this economy.  We began working on what eventually became our company in 2007, maybe year before the bankers managed to destroy the global economy.  Pete was freelancing for fancy fashion brands in NYC.  His unease about how reliant the industry was on exploiting cheap overseas labor ended up becoming a driving force behind how we conduct our business. When the economy crashed and he was put out of work, he finally had the time we needed to get started sewing.

We’re also fortunate that all the giant companies are dropping their pros for double-corking, energy-drink guzzling kids.  We figure that there’s an entire untapped market of former pros that still need gear to ride in, but don’t want to buy anything from the mega-corporations that put them out to pasture.

What’s different about your brand?

We design all of our products for ourselves, our friends, and our families. We’re not chasing the same naive teenage market that the rest of the business world is ever scrambling after.  Our business is not to attempt to package “coolness” for re-sale to insecure kids.  Owner Operator is about providing a classic product at a fair price.

No really, why should people support you and not some other independent brand?

People absolutely should support other independent brands.  If every dollar is a vote for how you want to the world to be, consider what you’re voting for.  There was a time when practically every brand was independent, and we were all the better for it.

Who are you and why do you think you’re qualified to run a business?

We’re just two people, with some help from our friends.  I’m a frustrated artist living in Providence RI, with my wife and baby girl.  I work in Boston all week, and spend the train commute trying to figure out how to keep Owner Operator running. Pete is an out of work menswear designer living in Hell’s Kitchen, NYC living on food stamps.

Our business plan is simple. We scrape together whatever cash we can, design and manufacture our products locally, and mark them up enough to hopefully keep our company running.  We’re just trying to do the right thing, the only way we know how. Hopefully that’s enough.

Rumor is snowboarding is shrinking and skiing is the next big thing. Do you plan on sponsoring skiers to make more money?

I plugged my TV back in last winter to watch Downhill in the Olympics.  The women’s Downhill ended up being the only part of the Games that I saw, and it was amazing.  If we could sponsor them, we’d do it in a second.

What will you do after you get rich off snowboarding?

If I was suddenly rich, I’d use the cash to build Owner Operator into the best snowboarding company in the world.  I’d quit my full-time job.  If we ended up really flush, we could get Pete off of food stamps.

Upstate Clothing Co.

Established: 2007
Location: Brooklyn, NY

www.upstateclothingco.com

Yobeat: Why would you start a snowboard company in this economy?

Mike Callaghan: I don’t think I ever actually “started” a company. It just kind of happened. People kept asking me to make more shit, so I did. And here I am.

What’s different about your brand?

We actually put a lot of focus on how our stuff fits and feels. We don’t just print on short and boxy tee’s like 95% of people out there. Plus we make beer koozies. Who doesn’t like beer?

No really, why should people support you and not some other independent brand?

Because you’re supporting a good group of dudes by doing so. We’re not out to be rich, we honestly just want to make some good shit, that’s not all crazy prints or crazy colors, that you’ll be psyched on wearing. Everything that we make right now, you’ll love wearing in 3 years just as much as you do today. Not like those tall tee’s that are already sitting in bottom drawer hiding your porn mags. By supporting us, you’re supporting all that is good in snowboarding. By not supporting us, you’re saying you want snowboarding’s future to be nothing but superpipe and Sal Masakela’s. Do the right thing.

Who are you and why do you think you’re qualified to run a business?

I’m just some 27-year-old dude from New York that just fucking loves snowboarding. In my 15 years of riding I’ve seen it all. Seen dumb styles come and go, and I just want to make sure that style still remains a huge part of snowboarding. More so than how many times you can huck yourself upside down and “sick” you are at chugging energy drinks. I’m not sure if I am qualified to run my own business at all. I’ve run stores for years for big ass companies, but when it comes to my own company, I’m learning.

Rumor is snowboarding is shrinking and skiing is the next big thing. Do you plan on sponsoring skiers to make more money?

Absolutely not.

What will you do after you get rich off snowboarding?

Buy 30 packs of PBR instead of 12 packs.

It would be great if every day you went snowboarding was sunny, bluebird and knee deep. Ski resorts would never have to resort to tricky language, and you’d never have to think about if it’s going to be worth the drive. Unfortunately, that is not the way the world works. In fact, more often than not, the strings of bluebird pow days happen while you’re at work, and then your one day off ends up being cold and rainy. So you have a decision to make: do you sit at home, watch some reality TV and maybe play some video games, or, do you get off your ass, break out your most waterproof gear and just tough it out? We recommend the latter, so here are a few tips for making the most of a shitty day.

Don’t be a sissy

First of all, it’s just rain and you’re not the wicked witch of the west. Deal with it.

Think Positive

There are good things about rain days. You don’t have to get up early (you’re not missing anything) and you won’t have to wait in line. If you hate crowds and aggro lift lines, you’ll love riding on a rain day.

Dress for it

The right goggles can make all the difference. For the record, the right goggles are not mirrored lenses — one run in they will be a smeary mess, and potentially ruined forever. Clear lenses are a good call for minimal visual obstruction. Rain days are not good days to wear jeans, in fact, you may want to grab one of those sweet rain bags, not only good for keeping you dry-ish, but also for sliding around on your back, which is always fun.

Do Stupid Tricks

It’s not pow, but in general, if it’s warm enough to rain, the snow is nice and soft. Add in the fact that rain usually dissuades the park lurkers from hanging out at the top of jumps, and it’s a great day to try new, potentially embarrassing tricks (either completely ridiculous on purpose, or just cause you suck at them) in the park with no judgment.

Ride the gondola

If your mountain has one, enclosed lifts are god’s gift to rain days. Sitting on the lift is by far the worst part of riding in the rain, so if that portion of your day is spent in a comfy car, you really have NO reason not to ride.

Of course, riding in the rain is not all lollipops and unicorns. It’s hard to see, and it will probably take your clothes three days to dry. But 99% of the time, if you go snowboarding, you’ll be glad you did, so suck it up and go shred.

Video filmed with the GoPro® HD Helmet HERO™ Camera on location at Timberline.

It’s 2011 and with this shaping up to be the best season ever and all, it’s time for some resolutions… so here’s five! Feel free to ignore them, or if you wanna be as cool as us (hack, gag) then you should follow this amazingly good example we’re setting and attempt to emulate them.

1. Stop the Ski Hate

If you’ve been reading this site (or really any snowboard publication) for any amount of time, you’ll know how difficult this is going to be. Not only was hating on skiing ingrained in us by skiers themselves from the day we first strapped on that snowboard back in the 90s, but it’s so much fun. Just check the incredibly hilarious comments on any of these past ski hate flame bait pieces we’ve posted. It’s like they do the work for you! But it’s a new year, a new decade, and perhaps even time to bury the hatchet once and for all, so we’re going to try our hardest this year to avoid the traffic trap that is ski hate. I mean, look at the dudes in this “Ankle Deep” video, which we (mainly) didn’t post because of skiing. They’re just having fun bro, isn’t that what it’s all about? But, that said…

…based on the above video, we still do not believe skiers should be allowed to hit rails.

2. Don’t duck ropes


Jan Eberharter and his friends are total rebels (see :39). Don’t be like them.

Being a rule-disobeying badass when you snowboard is part of the reason snowboarding is so fun, for me at least. One of the main reasons I got into it to long ago is because as a defiant teen with skier parents, it was cool and rebellious (no seriously, it used to be!), but this year, things have gotten serious. It might just be more apparent because Boardistan insists on reporting on every snowboard death, but snowboarding is especially dangerous this season. This is putting ski areas on especially high alert, and it seems they will clip your pass for even the most minor infraction. Since I personally have already lost one pass this year, I’m gonna do my best to stay safe and follow the rules for all of 2011 and encourage the rest of the jerks who work for me to do the same. 2012… well, the world is gonna end so no reason to be a pussy then.

3. Wear a Helmet

A recent repost of a completely innocent piece written in 1999 somehow turned into a 60-comment helmet debate. And while we never expect to convince a-man that wearing a helmet is actually warm, comfortable and functional, at this point, I personally have already lost too many brain cells not to. (It’s also a good zone for Yobeat branding!)

4. Drink More

Actually, I think we (especially Party Time Nate) drink enough. It’s just funny to make this resolution every year.

5. Be nicer to Nick Lipton


Nick Lipton: the intern years

Sometimes I try to remember what life was like before I met Nick Lipton in the Mt. Hood Meadows terrain park and asked if he could intern for me. I can’t, mostly because of all those brain cells lost after years of not wearing a helmet, but anyway, the little guy, as annoying as he is, was the number one motivator behind YoBeat being a “real thing” now. He went and got himself a real job at Chicago’s most powerful (junior) ad exec last fall, and admittedly I have been giving him a lot of shit about the half-assed job he’s been doing for Yobeat lately. I still contend he is doing a half-assed job, but this year, I’m going to try out this empathy thing and believe that maybe, just maybe, he actually is as busy as he says (unlike when he complained constantly during college.) However, this will be the hardest one of all.

When it comes to a banked slalom competition, the worst possible turn of events after a day of pounding rain would be a massive temperature drop. The mushy berms would turn to solid ice, and on a course such as the one for this year’s Dirksen Derby, fly outs and tree collisions would be a given. This is a fun event for a good cause though, so even that bitch Mother Nature, who taunted the event with some of the worst possible weather on the first day, decided to cooperate, and that didn’t happen!

On December 12, things were warm and slushy and sun the even came out towards the end of the day at Mt. Bachelor. Of course, certain competitors (ahem, Jake Price) still managed to hit the trees, but that was more a matter of how aggressive they were getting. The divisions for day two included the token skiers, the elites (consisting of riders who’d previously placed in the top slots) and the men ages 14-49 (one division, a whole lotta’ dudes.) As with day one, each rider a one run through each course and then as a bonus got an optional “Mulligan” where they could try to best one of their times. The catch was, no one was told what those times were, so there was a chance you could actually make your time worse.

In short, people went fast, turned left and right, and ate Chowder from the Parilla Grill between runs. The smiles were plentiful, the course was fun, and a good time was had by all. When the final times were tabulated, Austin Smith came in with the fastest time of 53.46. That would have bested the “elites” too, but as Austin’s only previous Derby appearance was on a sit ski, he was not qualified for that division. However, his time topped Elite champ Curtis Ciszek by almost a full second. In addition to his golden glove and goodie pack, Austin was also treated to a rousing round of Happy Birthday at the awards (in honor of the fact it is his in two days.)

The Dirksen Derby is the best. While winning is awesome, just being there, putting a smile on Tyler Eklund’s face, and drinking beers from a keg in the parking lot is what it’s really about. Personally, I can’t think of a better kick off to the best season ever.

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Mens

1. Austin Smith 53.46
2. Allister Schultz 55.46
3. Ryland Bell 55.71
4. Logan Beaulieu 55.82

Elites

1. Curtis Ciszek 54.31
2. Jake Price 54.60
3. Adam Haynes 55.31
4. Bryan Fox 55.35
5. Brandon Luzier 56.44
5. Travis Yamada 57.35
6. Jason McAlister 101.94

Token Skier

1. Rex Shepard
2. Lucas Wachs
3. Hames Ellerbe

Something about human nature makes it hard for us to appreciate our current situation. There are a million cliched sayings about it (i.e. You don’t know what you’ve got ’til it’s gone), so you know it’s true. But as salty and jaded as we are here at YoBeat, there’s really nothing more annoying than reading an editorial about the good old days of snowboarding. You know, the days before the sport was ruined by the Olympics and so underground only the really cool people knew about it, blah, blah, blah. Talking about the past is great, and it’s definitely important to know snowboard history and respect those who got us to where we are, but after a banner early season, I am going to come out and say it: this is going to be the best season to be a snowboarder, ever. Here’s why:

Mt. Baker, with less snow than it will get this year. photo: Dylan Hart

1. La Nina

You’ve heard the hype, but what is La Nina and why is it going to make this the best season, ever? Like most things weather, NOAA knows the answer. “La Niña is characterized by unusually cold ocean temperatures in the Equatorial Pacific.” In layman’s terms, the ocean is colder. When the ocean is colder, the air is colder, and when the air is cold, rain turns into snow. Specifically, NOAA predicts this season, “Expected impacts in the United States include an enhanced chance of above-average precipitation in the Pacific Northwest, Northern Rockies (along with a concomitant increase in snowfall), and Ohio Valley.” Yep, it’s gonna snow, snow, snow. Remember 1998? No? Well, it’s the year Mt. Baker broke the world snowfall record, and another big La Nina Spanish sounding ocean current pattern year (suck it Paul). If the past few weeks are any indication, this year might just be better.

Illustration stolen from Onboard. Hopefully they don’t sue us.

2. Board Technology Is Good and Getting Better

I’ve spent years preaching that the board you’re riding doesn’t really matter — for most people who snowboard, any modern board will do. But despite the my indifference, board companies have continued to innovate and design equipment specific for just about any purpose, and this year there are more good options than ever. These days you can get a board that will literally make the kind of riding you like to do easier. No more hours of leg extensions to get strong enough for presses: reverse camber makes it easy! Don’t want to drown in the powder? A nice board with carbon stringers, or even a split board, will treat you right. And if you’ve just gotten tired of the same old carving, try out a different board construction. Today’s boards literally change the way snowboarding feels, so there’s no excuse to be bored. Remember, in the early 90s, people used to use duct tape to hold things together. So as epic as 93/94 was, this year will definitely be better than that.


Jed is wearing a helmet. You should too! Photo: Paul Miller

3. You don’t have to die

That’s right, even though double corks are the norm, snowboarding is safer than ever, mostly because wearing helmets is no longer lame. Thanks largely in part to early ambassadors such as Jesse Burtner, and more recent helmet poster boys such as Jed Anderson, it’s actually gotten pretty cool to wear a helmet. Helmets are also a big part of the reason Kevin Pearce, Mike Schwartz and Cole Atencio are still with us, so don’t be an idiot and wear one.


Remember those trail maps you use to have to fold and put in your pocket? Those were annoying. Itrailmap3d is better!

4. iPhones

Is there anything in life haven’t smart phones made better? Well, dinnertime conversations aside, iPhones have made snowboarding better and easier, too. Too stupid to pick what lens to use? There’s an app for that. Too lazy to write your days down on a calender? There’s an app for that. And even if you never download or used an app, the fact that you can hook your phone directly up to your helmet, listen to music, and then with a press of a button answer a call, makes fitting snowboarding into your life that much easier. You can talk to your girlfriend on lift, tell your mom what you want for dinner, or even take care of business mid run. Sure, using snowboarding as an excuse to get away from it all is great, but in this economy, it’s important to stay in touch! And more than that, a few years ago, people used to rely on walkie talkies and have to try and find an open channel to connect with their friends on hill, no more! If you are really serious about staying connected, they even make special gloves now for Facebooking in the cold, too.

The footyfeind.com Crew has a GoPro. Do you?


5. You’re gonna be famous!

For years you’ve had to snowboard and simply rely on your story telling prowess to tell everyone how awesome you are. But not anymore! Thanks to the magical invention called the GoPro, you no longer have to do ANYTHING without capturing it on video. Then you can come home, easily edit it to the new MGMT or Lil Wayne song, upload to Vimeo and boom! You’re famous on the Internet. Ok, not really, but it will be cool to look back on when you’re old and decrepit and remember: hell yeah, that was a great year!

You probably have some other personal reasons that this season is gonna be good, but you get the idea. If you’re old, stop yearning for the past. If you’re young, live it up. This is gonna be an amazing season, so get out there and ride!

You’re a snowboarder, which means you are either broke, or pretending to be. No matter how little money you have though, you probably still like to eat on a regular basis, and chances are, you hit the drive through more than you like to admit. And why the hell not? It’s cheap and easy, and it sure does taste good after a long day of ‘boarding. The same old fast food can get mighty boring though, so with a little inspiration from fancyfastfood.com, Party Time Nate set out to create a gourmet meal with a few things we picked up on the drive down from the mountain. If you’d like to recreate this delicious meal yourself, Nate explains how in the video above.

And because it’s amazing, here are specifics on what we bought, how much we spent and the calorie counts of each.

Dairy Queen
6 piece Chicken Strip Basket (includes fries and sauce) 1410 calories
Total: $5.99

Mcdonalds
McRib 500 calories
Medium Fries 380 calories
McDouble 390 calories
Total: $5.79

Jack in the Box
Medium Curly fries 430 calories
2 Hamburger deluxe 360 calories each
Side of rice 242 calories
Total: $5.24

Del Taco
Double Del Burger 560 calories
10 Crunchy Tacos 130 calories each
Total: $6.49

Grand Total Calories: 5932
Grand Total Cost: $23.51

(And people wonder why Americans are fat)

RJ enjoys a nice cold glass of milk on a YoBeat field trip to Patti’s Homeplate

It’s the dream of many young snowboarders: the industry internship. We established awhile ago that interns will save the snowboard industry, and with the inexplicable increased popularity of YoBeat these days, we were in need of some extra help. So we hired a young chap named RJ Sweet. He comes in every day after school and does all the crap we don’t want to deal with. However, before we could really admit to having RJ on staff, he needed a little hazing. So we brought him up to Timberline for a day of intern training.

Despite all my yelling, RJ passed. He did a great job lacing my boots, and it sure was nice having someone other than Jared to yell at. So for his first official YoBeat assignment, I asked him to write a report on his internship, and let everyone know what the experience is really like.

Coming into Yobeat as an intern I was clueless on what to expect. What would they want me to do, and more importantly, would my boss be an overly-serious, uptight jerk?

After nearly a month at YoBeat, I have come to the conclusion that my boss and I have a relationship that most don’t have.  I get to water her flowers, put on her boots, and carry everyone’s gear to the designated destination. I also get yelled at for not landing my “stunts” or not performing the “stunt” that was intended. Finally I’m crammed in the back of the car with all the snowboards and gear.

When we’re not snowboarding, I am tweeted about on a daily basis. Usually my comical remarks are quoted, but I’m still too young to understand why most of them are funny. Brooke also gives me the jobs she doesn’t like doing, like going to the post office almost every day. If you jerks could stop ordering stuff it would really make my life easier.

On a good note though, I do get hooked up with Yobeat apparel, as well as free meals here and there, so be jealous. Sure do think I’m going to enjoy my time here at Yobeat, so hopefully I don’t get fired because this story sucks.

Oh RJ, I’m not gonna fire you. I really hate going to the post office. However, I don’t appreciate you telling people not to buy stuff, in fact, to ensure you have lots of do at the post office today, I just put the gold die cuts featured in the video in the store. For the rest of you: If you want one, get em while they last, they are SUPER LIMITED. OMG.
http://yobeat.bigcartel.com/product/limited-edition-gold-die-cut